What is a CRM Strategist?

I have been involved in an ongoing debate within a LinkedIn group regarding the roles of consultants with “CRM” in their titles. Traditionally, consulting organisations have treated CRM as being within or even a dedicated Strategy practice. However, they will also employ CRM Consultants within a Technology practice (maybe aligned with a software vendor e.g Oracle, SAP, Salesforce).

The debate has raged on whether there are two distictly different roles (CRM Strategy and CRM Technology) or whether there is crossover. I argue that there is certainly crossover but it is not a skillset I come across routinely. This was confirmed to me when I had a recent meeting with Johann Jacobs, a Gartner eCRM Analyst, who admitted that he had not met too many CRM Strategists but felt that most CRM initiatives badly needed one!

I am currently consulting in a role titled “CRM Strategist and Archtect”. I am working with my client to help articulate their vision for Customer Service and subsequently develop and define a Strategy and Roadmap. We will then select and implement a CRM product to deliver the processes that are bound by that strategy and hence meet the strategic and tactical objectives.  I expect to be involved in all of those activities. If a Management Consultancy were to replace me, my client would be likely to get one person for the strategy and another for the product. The lack of continuity means that the Implementer needs to interpret the intent of the Strategist in designing the solution. This can introduce unnecessary risk. I therefore believe that, as a Business Strategist, it is important to have a strong understanding of the technological footprints and offerings that can help enable the strategy that has been designed. The Strategist should be able to help architect and assure the chosen solution to meet the objectives of the organisation.

However, there is a further complication: Software companies often subdivide their Software Consultants into Functional and Technical. The Functional Consultant tends to be understanding of the business environment and able to turn business requirements into a solution through basic configuration of the system. The Technology Consultant works with the IT Department to embed the new software into the IT Infrastructure. There is crossover with the Functional Consultant but this can be limited depending on the type of software and the skill levels of each.

In my experience, a functional consultant may understand the needs of the Sales, Marketing and/or Customer Service division but may not necessarily have the skills to help develop strategy, work on business cases or articulate future roadmaps. In my opinion, the CRM Strategist is capable of fulfilling the Functional Consultant role as well as being a Strategy Consultant. This really adds value to clients.

Without knowledge of the capabilities of a CRM Product, Unified Communications or other such enabling technology, how can a feasible vision or roadmap be developed? One has to know what is possible to be able to define it. Functional Consultants can implement a process that leads to improvements. The strategist will set the entire context within which the process sits. Furthermore, the functional consultant really should understand the strategic direction and long term objectives of an organisation in order to create the optimal, future-proof design. With the market changing at a rapid pace, increasingly innovative solutions are able to be developed. However, these “To Be” solutions should be within a context of where that organisation wishes to be. A CRM Strategist can bridge these worlds saving organisations the cost of employing two discreet skillsets and bringing the continuity of taking the conceived into the delivered. As more and more organisations appreciate and recognise the need for appropriate skillsets, there is likely to be a polarisation between Strategists and Technical CRM Consultants. This may seem like I am contradicting myself as this is how I described the structure of many Consultancies. However, I believe that Technical will mean Technical. Functional will merge into Strategy (and vice versa) meaning that the Strategists will be involved on Programs both before, during and, possibly, after an implementation. They will carry a broader set of skills and need to communicate with different audiences. However, the value to be added will be significant and the CRM Strategist should become he norm, not the exception!

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Author: Nick Davey

Evangelist, Strategist, Leader, Implementor, Author, Speaker and all round nice guy, Nick has built his entire career on improving the management of customers both from a customers perspective "looking in" and from within an organisation "looking out". You might call it CRM. Customer Relationship Management or, as Nick often says, Constantly Realigning Misconceptions. Nick reiterates that his comments are his own personal comments and do not necessarily reflect the opinions, strategy or views of any previous employer or customer.. He is delighted to be impartial and able to share ideas with open minded and collaborative professionals around the world. Outside of his passion for CRM, Nick pursues other less demanding passions such as Scuba Diving, Native Wildlife (e.g Wallaby) Rescue and Rehabilitation, Amateur Flying and watching as much Sport as his long suffering wife will permit.

1 thought on “What is a CRM Strategist?”

  1. Hi Nick A very thoughtful post thank you. You obviously have an intimate knowledge of the market. I think the key point is that “They will carry a broader set of skills and need to communicate with different audiences.” I believe that such is the revolution taking place that we do need new structures, new skills and new roles. The first essential is that we need to be “outside-in” or customer driven. The customer wants clarity of language, of interaction with his supplier and with his understanding of who does what. When we say marketing, or CRM we are immediately into preconceptions, legacy training issues and confused perceptions. Secondly I think we need to move to much more cross functional activity. As soon as we label a product, process or tool as IT, marketing, sales etc you immediately have the legacy issues to deal with. At least with the Clienteer role people ask “what’s that” and have no preconceptions.

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