I am your Customer

I am your Customer

I may also be your Supplier, your Employee, your Partner, your Student, your Stakeholder, your Consumer, your Influencer or your Citizen.

I reserve the right to voice my opinion about you, your products, your people, your services and my experience with you at any time and across any channel I want.

I reserve the right to be wrong but be treated as if I was right and reserve the right to  accuse you of being wrong, even if you were right.

I expect to be treated as if I was your only customer but I also expect to be treated as the best customer, regardless of whether I may or may not be.

I am your Customer.

However, I reserve the right to go to someone else. It is your job to stop me.

I reserve the right to shop around. It is up to you to make me loyal to your brand.

I reserve the right to expect you to get it right first time, every time even though I realise that nobody is perfect.

I reserve the right not to tell you that though.

I reserve the right to avoid telling you anything about myself although I expect you to know.

I reserve the right to expect the same “deals” as an existing customer as you would to attract new ones.

I am your customer.

I creserve the right to be difficult, annoying, irritable, demanding, irrational and a downright pain in the backside. Sometimes all at once.

However, I am YOUR customer and without me and my fellow customers, you won’t have a business. We know that and expect you to get that.

I am your customer but if you accept me on my terms, I will be your customer for life and will help you achieve your dreams.

 

 

Advertisements

A Banking dichotomy

A recent experience with UBank has got me wondering whether the intention to create a good customer experience has led to a bad experience?

I first want to say that I am not expressing a view in this post, merely an observation. This is in the light of a very good recent experience with UBank who are an Australian Internet bank (part of NAB- National Australia Bank) and an incident with them that may cause me to churn. Hence the dichotomy.

The Internet site is supported by an excellent 24/7 Contact Centre which appears to be very customer centric and well organised. I recently set up my Internet Banking from home using my home broadband connection which uses the only phone line coming into the house. We live in a rural location so have no mobile phone signal at home. When I went to update my personal details online, UBank sent a SMS code for me to enter onto the website to verify the change. Of course, I could not receive the SMS as I had no mobile signal. The SMS was only valid for 10 minutes.

I soon realised that UBank had set up this “security measure” for every single transaction that I would make online. Payments, Transfers, Changes in details all receive SMS verification. With most of the Australian population living in areas with decent mobile coverage, I’m sure this isn’t a common issue to the banking giants but it is to me.

I rang UBank to ask whether there was another option. I was told it is the banks policy to provide this “more secure” method to protect their customers. This is very noble but why couldn’t I receive an email notification instead? Apparently UBank and NAB do not believe this option is as secure so they have adopted the SMS as the standard verification method.

This renders the site useless to me for “home” banking and I am now about to churn. It raises an interesting point though. This initiative has been taken to attempt to protect the customer. It is done with the customer in mind. However, because I have no other options of validation, the approach means that anyone in remote areas of the country will struggle with this issue.

I therefore wonder whether this is an example of good or bad customer centricity? It is good in wanting to make my banking experience safer but bad in that it does not give me the choice in how I want to receive that experience.

I would be interested to know what others think?

CRM and Xmas

Why is it that some companies good work in delivering customer service throughout the year goes to pot over Xmas?
I have had a few recent examples where it appears that a lack of preparedness has undermined any goodwill generated previously.
A good example is an excellent web site that I use frequently.

It is called “I Want One Of Those” and features novelty gift items. It is innovative, fresh and well designed. However, it appears to be a victim of its own success.

However, the increased pressure from Xmas has overstressed a poorly designed “non delivery” process. I ordered a present from Australia to be delivered to my parents in the UK. It never arrived. When I enquired, they responded promptly to tell me that I had to complete a “Statutory Declaration” stating that it hadn’t arrived. In other words, they didn’t believe me. They put the Stat Dec form in the post to the RECIPIENT (therefore spoiling any potential surprise) and my parents promptly filled it in and posted it back. By now Xmas was upon us and nothing more had been heard. I chased them up and they had no record of ever sending a Stat Dec to my parents or of receiving one back. Therefore, we had to do it all over again. I asked whether, given that we are in the 21st century, we couldn’t use email to save time. After another day of delibaration by IWOOT, they agreed (poorly designed process!!!) and within 24 hours, they had the 2nd Stat Dec.

By now, it is nearly 2 months since I ordered. I chased them up again yesterday. They confirmed that, yes, they had the Stat Dec but that the item I had ordered was now ‘no longer available” and they would refund me my money.

Think about the Customer Experience. How do you think I feel as a Customer? It was meant to be a birthday present so, thanks to inefficiency at IWOOT, the secret was spoilt and remained unfulfilled. Very unsatisfactory. A refund is hardly what I wanted to hear.

How much of this is due to Xmas and how much to poor processes, it is difficult to say. I do know, however, that their processes have been designed to suit IWOOT (inside-out) and not from a customer perspective (outside-in).

However, there is an interesting conclusion. Have I churned? No. Why? Because the “product” is that good that it is worth more to me to continue using them until a viable alternative appears. This challenges the notion that customer experience drives loyalty. It certainly is a major factor but is not the only factor.

Avoiding the Tipping Point

Everybody has a tipping point. That moment where an equilibrium is broken and the trend is reversed. Look at any election. What will cause a voter to “switch” from one particular choice to another? That ’cause’ is the tipping point.It is when the reasons to change become stronger than the reason to stay. The weight has shifted on the scales. The tipping point is reached and the scales sway in the other direction. It is the final nail in the coffin. The last straw. The moment of realisation.
With Customer Loyalty, the same is often true. Customers will follow a particular buying pattern or behaviour until they reach a tipping point. If loyalty to the brand or product is low, it does not take much. Buying fuel is, to me, a commodity. Out of habit, I tend to buy petrol at my cheapest local petrol station. However, if I’m running late, I may choose to go somewhere even closer but slightly more expensive. It’s not a big deal. I have no particular loyalty to a particular brand or petrol station. Being a bit cost conscious, I fill up habitually at the station offering the cheapest fuel around but the price differential is not that great. Therefore if I am time poor, I may shop closer to home and pay just a bit extra. Low tipping point. Low loyalty.
However, most Marketeers will tell you that creating a brand is everything. The brand has an intrinsic value that causes customers to perceive it differently and value it more. Brands attract loyalty, but that loyalty also has a tipping point at which that loyalty will be tested once too often or too far and the customer will subsequently defect to another product.
So the goal of most organisations dealing with customer loyalty is to do two things. Firstly, create brand loyalty. Secondly, ensure the tipping point is never reached. The Customer Experience has a major impact on both of these factors and partially explains why there is an increased focus on it. The latter is equally hard to do yet, in my opinion, gets less organisational attention.
Ironically, organisations cannot always wholly control the tipping point. Virgin Blue, the Australian airline, has a pretty good reputation for creating customer loyalty. Partly through its Velocity Frequent Flyer Programme but also by differentiating on attempting to improve all stages of the customer experience. Just over a week ago, Virgin Blue’s ticketing system crashed causing the cancellation of the majority of flights and leaving passengers stranded. It took several days to rectify and had a major negative impact on the brand from a reputational point of view. Ironically, the Virgin system at fault is not their own: It is (apparently) an outsourced solution. Not that this is any comfort to the thousands of irate passengers last week. My point, however, is that Virgin could not wholly control this “tipping point” although they could mitigate the risk. The dilemma facing Virgin Blue now is the longer term impact on its loyal customers. How many of them may regard the problems of last week as their personal tipping point? It will be a real test for the strength of the brand.
Organisations must always be on the look out for these tipping points. Years ago, people joined a bank and tended to stay with that bank for life. Nowadays, banks have made it easy and enticing to switch and, with customer expectations increasing over time, the tipping point is more easily reached than in yesteryear.
The same is true of many services, yet the tipping points are not always studied. How many organisations conduct ‘exit’ interviews on defecting customers? How many organisations attempt to identify weaknesses in their service offerings to proactively remove potential tipping points?
Consumer choice and awareness creates the potential for churn. Yet, often people buy for emotional reasons, whether it is habitual, a remembered good experience, what your parents did or even a familiar ‘name’ heard through mass media. With such a fragile recipe for loyalty, is it any wonder organisations should spend as much time protecting the brand from churn as they do in building the brand in the first place?